Category social media

Integrity Must Be a Social Media News Priority

Category: Mediasocial mediawriting Comments: No comments

integrity on social mediaAs a senior in highschool, I wrote a paper on how journalism was changing. In late 2009 the Ipad was going to replace the print newspaper. Print journalism has declined, though its integrity persists. Daily circulation has fallen 7% from last year due to a 9% dip in print circulation.

Social media news consumption, conversely, continues to rise. Facebook in particular has become a popular outlet. Statistics from a Pew Research study show that 67% of adults use Facebook and 66% of Facebook users get news from the site. Thus, 44% of adults get news from Facebook. That’s reach.

Fake news stories find life on Facebook

The 2016 election (or perhaps more accurately the 2015-2016 election) brought many topics to the forefront...

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YouTube Heroes: Internet Vigilante Justice

Category: Mediasocial media Comments: No comments

YouTube HeroesYouTube recently made the move to get more social.

Under the still-in-Beta “community” tab, content creators (the artist inside me just shuddered) will have the ability to post text, images, GIFs, all the usual social tropes. Users can like and comment on the items in this stream, giving them a way to connect with the channel operators they most enjoy.

Sarah Perez points out that this is Google’s latest attempt to rejigger its social presence. (Any Google+ users in the house?) Social media is snatching up Internet ground like it’s post-WWII Eastern Europe. But is it necessarily a positive that YouTube is becoming more social? More social features theoretically mean more engagement, which means more advertising — so yes, as a business decision it makes sense.

But have you been to ...

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Facebook News Needs Journalistic Integrity

Category: Mediasocial media Comments: No comments

Facebook news image Who do you consider the ultimate news authority? The way the 2016 presidential election has unfolded begs the question. Perhaps the rational answer is that no news outlet should be considered the end-all-be-all when it comes to journalistic clout. Only with a variety of sources and perspectives can you form a well-rounded opinion.

Throughout the last sixteen months though, even institutions like The New York Times and Associated Press have made some mistakes in an effort to publish quickly. I’ve called attention to the consequences of a 24-hour news cycle before — it has no doubt changed the way news is produced and consumed. We’re starting to see a shift in journalistic trust that tends more toward the chaotic.

Where do you go for news? If you’re a moderately affluent adult in 2016...

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Crisis and Social Media: The New Normal

Category: MediaMobilesocial media Comments: No comments

Downtown-Dallas-Crisis2Last night my girlfriend and I sat on the couch watching Mr. Robot. I thought I heard a faint popping noise that I assumed came from Independence Day holdovers. We live three miles from downtown Dallas. About ten minutes later, I checked the group message I share with high school friends. One of them had said “I wouldn’t go outside if I were you, Neely.” I didn’t understand what that meant. I checked Twitter and the rest of my night got sucked into a wormhole.

It’s unmistakable, the feeling of watching a crisis unfold online. It starts with a kernel. You begin connecting dots and speculating in your head while you pan for more information. Even with a lightning-fast news source like Twitter, it takes time to figure out what’s happening...

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Trend manipulation and #HeterosexualPrideDay

Category: Mediasocial media Comments: No comments

trend-heterosexual-prideIs the Internet trolling itself with this trend?

Social media are home to acidic opinions, ready to melt the world around them. But what happened Wednesday morning felt like a nudge from an invisible hand. The question is worth asking.

The hashtag #heterosexualprideday appeared in 114K tweets by 7:15 AM, central time.

Heterosexual pride was a movement that largely took hold in the nineties as a counter to gay pride (see also: #AllLivesMatter).

I won’t take time to explain why this angers people. Just check Twitter, it’s pretty thorough.

A quick trend search for the topic reveals an avalanche of sarcastic quips. Memes, .gifs, and subreddit links all chip in to help the Twittersphere dismantle the farcical hashtag.

Trend perpetuation has happened before

During my research, the proponent...

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