audience tagged posts

Facebook News Needs Journalistic Integrity

Category: Mediasocial media Comments: No comments

Facebook news image Who do you consider the ultimate news authority? The way the 2016 presidential election has unfolded begs the question. Perhaps the rational answer is that no news outlet should be considered the end-all-be-all when it comes to journalistic clout. Only with a variety of sources and perspectives can you form a well-rounded opinion.

Throughout the last sixteen months though, even institutions like The New York Times and Associated Press have made some mistakes in an effort to publish quickly. I’ve called attention to the consequences of a 24-hour news cycle before — it has no doubt changed the way news is produced and consumed. We’re starting to see a shift in journalistic trust that tends more toward the chaotic.

Where do you go for news? If you’re a moderately affluent adult in 2016...

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Make the Bold Choice When Writing

Category: Mediawriting Comments: No comments

bold-choice-signActing is all about making a choice. You’ll hear directors and critics refer to a performer’s “choice” as being bold, or weak, or confusing. The words are on the page for the actor. It’s the way he or she chooses to interpret those words that dictates the performance. The relationship between writer and actor or director can sometimes become strained because the writer pens his or her words exactly as they should be delivered. Depending on the egos of the individuals involved, any deviation from the master plan can be interpreted as a criticism.

However, ultimately, writers have the same decisions facing them as performers. As a writer, you still get to make choices. Choosing to move boldly or in an unexpected way can totally change an audience’s perception of your story.

Our c...

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Do You Listen to Podcasts?

Category: advertisingMediaMobilePodcasts Comments: No comments

podcastsMy college career included a fickle schedule. Each semester brought a different course lineup. Clubs, teaching, improv, friends, and bars kept me busy when I wasn’t in class. I was always busy, but I rarely had a routine.

Since graduation, I have settled into a more consistent schedule. I don’t have to commute 45 minutes to work each day like my girlfriend, but I have dedicated blocks of free time. Since bars are expensive here and my friends have full-time jobs, I have replaced my college hobbies with podcasts. According to SmartAsset, that makes me a typical young, educated male.

Pre-university, I had known about podcasts as a concept. I kept MP4s of my radio shows from KSDB for theoretical future use...

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Social Media is Television in the 1960’s

Category: BloggingMediasocial media Comments: No comments

Kennedy-Nixon-DebateIn 1960, television changed the course of American history. John Kennedy squared off with Richard Nixon in the country’s first ever televised debate. Kennedy’s sparkling youth cast a long shadow over the uncomfortable Nixon. Because of this new medium (and possibly some voter fraud), Kennedy won the election, becoming the youngest president ever elected to the office.

It’s easy to overlook the significance of television when you see ads for the latest season of Real Housewives or anything on HLN. However, every major advancement in the field of media (printing press, radio, Internet, etc.) has been responsible for wholesale historical change.

Social media finds itself in this impactful position at the moment...

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Audience Fractionalization Creates Mini Echo Chambers

Category: Bloggingsocial media Comments: No comments

facebook-echo-chamberAudience fractionalization is the Internet inevitability that has radically changed media in the last ten years. With so many outlets vying for your time, you must choose a nucleus. A core group of bookmarks you visit each day. Fractionalization forces platforms to cater to their audiences. It allows for niche content markets and supports a variety of interests. It’s digital competition, which is good. However, some side effects hamper this unabashed freedom.

The splintering of the marketplace accelerated with the 24-hour news cycle. Cable stations offered audiences more voices and a variety of ways to consume the news throughout the day. The stories didn’t change, but the personalities and commentaries acted like plastic wrap, keeping content fresh for longer...

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