consumption tagged posts

Facebook News Needs Journalistic Integrity

Category: Mediasocial media Comments: No comments

Facebook news image Who do you consider the ultimate news authority? The way the 2016 presidential election has unfolded begs the question. Perhaps the rational answer is that no news outlet should be considered the end-all-be-all when it comes to journalistic clout. Only with a variety of sources and perspectives can you form a well-rounded opinion.

Throughout the last sixteen months though, even institutions like The New York Times and Associated Press have made some mistakes in an effort to publish quickly. I’ve called attention to the consequences of a 24-hour news cycle before — it has no doubt changed the way news is produced and consumed. We’re starting to see a shift in journalistic trust that tends more toward the chaotic.

Where do you go for news? If you’re a moderately affluent adult in 2016...

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The Rise of User-Generated Content

Category: advertisingBloggingBusiness Comments: No comments

Millennials-Love-UGCI’ve been watching lots of Facebook live recordings lately. They’re completed videos from  previous live streams. Usually it’s a friend or group of friends just hanging out, responding to the comments of other friends. It sounds  ridiculous as I type it out, but so does all user-generated content (UGC) consumption. It’s just stuff we throw out there without the production value or calculation of a professional content producer. Yet we spend an ever-growing amount of time with this form of media via our social networks.

I work in a creative bubble. I spend all of my free time around writers, comics, and improvisors — people who want other people to pay attention to them. I realize that may create a bias in my social media experience, but a Crowdtap poll from 2014 suggests that m...

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Twitter Moments Offers Positives and Pitfalls

Category: Bloggingsocial media Comments: No comments

Twitter-MomentsOn October 6, Twitter launched a new feature in its application called “Moments.” This is the latest attempt to expand the platform’s user base. Moments allow the reader to swipe through a series of tweets related to a particular news event. For the user, the feature functions almost like a miniature magazine. You flip through pages to hear different perspectives and see different images; each moment only takes about 60 seconds of your time. This gives Twitter a rival (with better organization in my opinion) to the Facebook Instant articles. I enjoy the feature. It’s fun and useful. However, I am not without some apprehension.

My concern is that people will start using Twitter Moments as a substitute for wholesome news coverage...

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