content tagged posts

Give Out Your Best Ideas … On a Blog

Category: advertisingBloggingBusinessContent & WritingFeatured Comments: No comments

Everyone is an expert in their own field. They’re immersed in a topic, learning everything there is to know about it … for roughly eight hours a day. Sometimes those topics even run into your personal time or after hours. The point is, however, that you know a whole lot. People come to you with questions, and if you don’t know the answer offhand, chances are you can get it very quickly.

During all of that brainstorming, you’re likely to come up with some new ideas.

So why not share them? No, not in the way that everyone can steal what you thought up, but in the way where you can get others talking and show your expertise.

And you can do so on your blog.

trust fall activity with men in suitsThe days of marketing for marketing’s sake are over. Customers are looking for value in your content...

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Taking Grammar Personally

Category: Content & WritingEducationFeaturedwriting Comments: No comments

grammar lessons cartoonWhen I was a copy editor in college, I learned a lot of lessons publically. My first day in the seat of head copy lady, the university president’s name was spelled three different ways. Three. It was my first experience running a team, and I assumed that writers, let alone copy editors, had done their jobs. By the end of my 2 am shift, I wasn’t checking much for spelling so much as I was writing headlines and making sure stories weren’t cut off mid-sentence. This ignorance on my part led to several emails, public jokes, and a level of embarrassment that, seven years later, I’m still not quite past. I should have known better.

That, of course, was the worst mistake, but there were plenty of others. Like the time we printed “remberance” in a headline...

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Why Do We Randomly Capitalize Words?

Category: Content & WritingFeaturedwriting Comments: No comments

Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 10.03.01 AMAs a proofreader, my number one change – by a long shot – is lower casing letters. It’s always been my biggest change. Random words that got the proper noun treatment without warrant, I return them back to their correct and lowercased status every time I switch on Track Changes. (Yes, that’s capitalized, as it’s a Word trademark.) Job titles, departments, and more are all shift+typed without reason, or rather, without clout. There is reason, after all, a majority of the population seems to think these words are actually capitalized. They believe they’re readily important, and I’m just the person demoting them with no cause.

But it’s not my rule, it’s English’s rule...

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Awesome Content Idea: The Report-a-Typo Tab

Category: Content & WritingFeaturedgrammar newsUncategorized Comments: No comments

Typos happen. Sometimes they’re dumb, a miss-stroke of the finger, and sometimes they’re downright blatant. You wonder how anyone could have made such a glaring error. I make them too. Sure they’re mindless and embarrassing, us writers are supposed to have our crap together, after all. That’s what we get paid to do. But the thing about editing your own work is that your brain eliminates typos. You know what you meant so you skim over what’s missing or what’s wrong without even realizing everything is not as it should be. It’s also how I talk.

Then, once these typos are posted, emails start pouring in (or texts or comments or phone calls), letting you know what error was made...

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Life Writing Skills School Should Have Taught Us

Category: Content & WritingEducationFeaturedwriting Comments: No comments

Dynamic Content-Writing an ObituaryThis weekend I helped a friend write her father’s obituary. He had been sick for some time and his death wasn’t so much of a surprise as it was a hardened reality. But that never makes the loss of a loved one any easier. It doesn’t make him less missed. Nor did it make writing about him in a few short paragraphs any easier for the family. So she called me and I listened to them talk – their stories, their intent, their wishes for the overall finished product. It wasn’t that I was more qualified or more experienced; it was my first obituary. It was that I was more removed from the situation. I was able to channel their grief in a way that they couldn’t immediately communicate.

There were still so many questions, though...

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